Kiely Long

ARH Scholars Spring 2019 Winner: Kiely Long

Twice a year, students from across the region are invited to apply for the Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) Scholars program. The ARH Scholars are awarded a $5,000 academic scholarship to pursue a degree in healthcare. Their stories are unique, but a common thread unites every winner: a desire to make a difference to the people of Appalachia through healthcare. The Spring 2019 class of the ARH Scholars includes 11 talented future healthcare providers.

Kiely Long, a recent graduate from Cumberland Gap High School, can’t say enough nice things about Claiborne County, Tennessee. “We’re a small town, and I get to visit the national parks a lot. They’re really rich in history and there are a lot of things to see.” Even so, she’s looking forward to the next step: in a few short months she’ll be off to East Tennessee State University to begin her journey toward a degree in Rehabilitative Health Sciences.

Why Rehabilitative Health Sciences? Kiely explains “I have a cousin who is a little under my age and she has Down syndrome. I’ve seen her spend time with all sorts of different therapists and I saw the difference that they made to her. I knew that therapy was definitely the field that I was going to pursue.”

“It took me a while to decide on a specialization,” she continues, “but I eventually settled on speech therapy. I had the opportunity to shadow a speech therapist at Caryville Elementary School, and I just loved the atmosphere. It was amazing to see the kids benefiting from therapy. I’ve been going there for a while, so I was able to see the difference that was made in these kids over just one year.”

Kiely credits the Speech-Language Pathologist, Brittany Buckner, with inspiring her to look into speech therapy as a profession. “She has been a huge help as I’ve been deciding. She’s been very patient with me and has answered all of my questions.”

By 2023 Kiely will be graduating from East Tennessee State with her bachelor’s degree, and then it’s on to her master’s degree courses. With years of schooling and loans down the road, she was ecstatic to find the ARH Scholars program on the scholarship page of her school’s website. “When I finally got the email saying that I’d been selected, my whole family pretty much started screaming. We were really excited.”

Even with many years of schooling ahead of her, Kiely has a clear goal in mind: “My entire life I’ve wanted to work with kids somehow. It sounds cliché, but I just want to help people. The kids that I saw during my time at the speech therapy office couldn’t look someone in the eye when having a conversation because they were so insecure about how they spoke. When I talked to them a year later, they were confident and outgoing. So, I’ve seen how something as simple as speech can affect a kid’s life. I want to be able to make that kind of difference. I think that everyone deserves to have a voice so that they can speak up. I want to help them find that voice.”

Full story can be found in The Claiborne Progress, August 7th edition.

McKenzie Daniel

ARH Scholars Spring 2019 Winner: McKenzie Daniel

Twice a year, students from across the region are invited to apply for the Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) Scholars program. The ARH Scholars are awarded a $5,000 academic scholarship to pursue a degree in healthcare. Their stories are unique, but a common thread unites every winner: a desire to make a difference to the people of Appalachia through healthcare. The Spring 2019 class of ARH Scholars includes 11 talented future healthcare providers.

McKenzie Daniel is one such student. Born and raised in West Liberty, McKenzie just graduated from Morgan County High School. He’s wrapped up a busy high school career playing soccer and tennis, in addition to being involved with his local Boy Scout Troop and church. He’ll have only a few months to relax this summer before heading off to Eastern Kentucky University where he’s planning to study pharmacology.

What compelled him to choose a future in pharmacy? Partially, his time in the Governor’s Scholars Program. “Last year I did the Governor’s Scholars Program, which is a five-week program over the summer. My focus area throughout that program was health care, which got me started learning about the medical field. I really enjoyed that process.” In addition to his time at Governor’s Scholars, McKenzie credits one of his teachers at Morgan County High School with inspiring him to pursue medicine: “I had a really good teacher in high school for biology, anatomy, and chemistry, Ms. Rudd—Chrystal Rudd. She really pushed me to learn more about science.”

Medicine isn’t all about science and education; it’s also the ability to make quick decisions and take others’ lives into your hands. This aspect is enough to discourage some, but McKenzie isn’t worried about that at all. “I’ve been lifeguarding for the past few years, and I enjoy taking the responsibility of making sure people are okay.”

No small part of getting a medical education is the expense. This year, after submitting his second application to the ARH Scholars, McKenzie was finally awarded a $5,000 academic scholarship to pursue his dreams of a pharmacy degree. “I was pretty excited when I found out that I’d won. The first time I applied I got turned down, so being awarded the second time I applied was really surprising.”

After McKenzie graduates from Eastern Kentucky University in 2023, he’ll be heading off to the University of Kentucky’s College of Pharmacy. After that, he’d love to head back to Eastern Kentucky to work close to home. “My community has done a lot for me,” McKenzie reflects. “I’d like to pay the community back for what they’ve done for me. If anyone in my community has health problems, I want to be there to assist them.”

Full story can be found in The Licking Valley Courier, Thursday, August 1st edition.

Aryn Pinson

ARH Scholars Spring 2019 Winner: Aryn Pinson

Twice a year, students from across the region are invited to apply for the Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) Scholars program. The ARH Scholars are awarded a $5,000 academic scholarship to pursue a degree in healthcare. Their stories are unique, but a common thread unites every winner: a desire to make a difference to the people of Appalachia through healthcare. The Spring 2019 class of ARH Scholars includes 11 talented future healthcare providers.

Aryn Pinson grew up in Pikeville, Kentucky, and she loved it. “I don’t think there is any better place to grow up. I love the hometown feel I get from Pikeville, and always having a community behind you is incredible.”

Aryn also loved Pikeville High School, where her mother is a teacher and where Aryn played volleyball in addition to her academics.

“I don’t think I would be where I am today if I didn’t have Pikeville High School.” Aryn says, “They taught me to have a strong work ethic.”

It takes a strong work ethic to succeed in medicine. While no one in Aryn’s family is in the medical field, she was inspired by friends of the family Sandy and Joel Thornbury, pharmacists who own an independent pharmacy in Pike County.

“They were such a good influence on me, and they are so devoted to their community. When people come into the pharmacy, the Thornburys know them by name and know what they need. They are willing to do anything for anybody. I www.QtheAgency.com

think a pharmacist should have those qualities. I love this profession and I credit them completely for that.”

After finishing up her four years at Pikeville High School, Aryn headed off to Eastern Kentucky University for her pharmacy school pre-requisites. Then, Aryn moved to Birmingham, Alabama to start pharmacy school at Samford University. So far, she’s enjoying the opportunities that Samford offers its students.

“This year I took part in the Birmingham Healthcare Access movement, which is a community health fair. We took people’s blood glucose and BMI and offered counseling services. I was stationed doing BMIs, taking the height and weight of patients and calculating their BMI for them. At a different station, someone would talk to them about what their BMI means and how they should go from there. It was eye-opening for me because it brought to light the need in the community.”

With so much need in the community, Appalachian Regional Healthcare is dedicated to helping students achieve their goals of getting a medical education. Aryn Pinson first heard about the ARH Scholars opportunity from her aunt who works at Hazard ARH Regional Medical Center. Though Aryn was overwhelmed at school during the application window, she pushed through and applied. And when she won?

“I was in shock. I could not believe it. It’s awesome that a healthcare provider in our community wants to help students strive for their goals, because sometimes funds are limited, especially in graduate school.”

When Aryn graduates in May of 2022, she plans to start her career at a bigger chain pharmacy to learn the ropes and catch her stride. Ultimately though, she wants to move home to Pikeville and open her own pharmacy. www.QtheAgency.com

“I want to help the people in my community,” she said. “I like having an impact on someone’s life. Being from a small community, pharmacists are often the most accessible healthcare provider. If you’re having a medical issue or a concern, you can just walk in and talk to a pharmacist. I want to be the person that my community can come and talk to, and I can help them figure out next steps. “

Full story can be found in Appalachian News-Express, July 30th edition.

Taylor Herrell

ARH Scholars Spring 2019 Winner: Taylor Herrell

Twice a year, students from across the region are invited to apply for the Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) Scholars program. The ARH Scholars are awarded a $5,000 academic scholarship to pursue a degree in healthcare. Their stories are unique, but a common thread unites every winner: a desire to make a difference to the people of Appalachia through healthcare. The Spring 2019 class of ARH Scholars includes 11 talented future healthcare providers.

Taylor Herrell just graduated from Letcher County Central High School in Whitesburg, Kentucky. Now she’s making plans to continue her studies as a chemistry pre-medical student at the University of Pikeville, where she hopes to graduate in the spring of 2023, before heading on to the Kentucky College of Optometry. While she had been considering optometry for some time, it was actually a viral video on social media that sealed the deal for Taylor: “I know this sounds crazy, but I saw a video about this little girl getting glasses, and being able to see clearly just made her day. Seeing how glasses made that little girl really happy just confirmed that’s what I wanted to do.”

Her interest in medicine has been largely inspired by her family, as both of Taylor’s parents are in the medical field. Her mother works as a nurse midwife, and her father as a nurse anesthetist. “I’ve always seen them working to help other people. Sometimes I would have to go to the hospital with them, and I always loved that environment. It’s great to see people helping people, especially in the small community that we have.” Taylor says that her family’s insistence that she follow her dreams and constant support have been hugely inspirational.

In addition to her parents, Taylor credits the Letcher County Central High School guidance counselors with pushing her towards her goals. “The guidance counselors encouraged me to do whatever I could to succeed… and to apply for a ton of scholarships.”

It makes perfect sense then that Taylor was recently awarded an educational scholarship from Appalachian Regional Healthcare. Taylor’s mother, who used to work at an ARH hospital brought the scholarship to Taylor’s attention, and Taylor couldn’t wait to apply. Her reaction when she won? “I was really overwhelmed and excited! I couldn’t believe it, honestly.”

As she prepares for her next step, she looks forward to someday returning to her hometown of Jenkins, Kentucky to practice.

“I want to stay close to home. I’ve never really been attracted to the idea of moving to a big city. I just love the people here and I love how everybody gets along with each other. Jenkins is a really small rural community where everyone knows each other. It’s nice to see someone you know everywhere you go. I want to give back to my community and help those who have helped me to succeed.”

Full story can be found in Letcher County Community News-Press, Wednesday, July 24th edition.

Logan Smith

ARH Scholars Spring 2019 Winner: Logan Smith

Twice a year, students from across the region are invited to apply for the Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) Scholars program. The ARH Scholars are awarded a $5,000 academic scholarship to pursue a degree in healthcare. Their stories are unique, but a common thread unites every winner: a desire to make a difference to the people of Appalachia through healthcare. The Spring 2019 class of ARH Scholars includes 11 talented future healthcare providers.

Logan Smith, from Barbourville, Kentucky became interested in the medical field in his sophomore year of high school. After sustaining a knee injury and subsequently undergoing a knee surgery, his interest in healthcare was piqued, but it was his time in physical therapy that was truly inspiring to him. He says it was the attentiveness of the physical therapists and assistants that first caught his attention: “I really appreciated how helpful everyone was at that office, and it sparked my interest as a potential career because I like work that’s more hands-on.”

He made sure to ask questions while he was there, and credits that therapist with inspiring him to pursue physical therapy as a profession. “I asked a lot of questions and he really helped me to understand the ins and outs of the job” Logan said. A friend of the family who works as a physical therapy assistant at Middlesboro ARH Hospital also mentored Logan and encouraged his interest in physical therapy. “I asked a lot of questions of him too. We talked about his work and what he liked and didn’t like about it. It was helpful to have people I knew who could honestly talk to me about the pros and cons of the job.”

Logan just finished his freshman year at Southeast Community College in Middlesboro and will graduate with his associate degree next May. He’s planning to transfer to University of Kentucky to finish his Bachelors before going on to obtain his Doctor of Physical Therapy degree.

Like so many other students pursuing a degree in healthcare, Logan’s road is long and expensive, and he’s driven to apply for as many scholarships as possible. He was ecstatic to discover the ARH Scholars opportunity, and even more thrilled when he was awarded the scholarship. “I’ve applied to so many scholarships, so to get even one is pretty rewarding,” Logan reflects. “The medical field is one of the most expensive fields to go into when it comes to the schooling. Prices get pretty high when you’re a medical student, so every little bit helps. It’s great for ARH to give back this way.”

ARH gives back through ARH Scholars, because ARH Scholars are driven to give back to their community through their work in the medical field. “Ultimately, I just want to help younger people who are injured, like I was. I feel like I can connect with them, and because I understand the mental process and physical process of healing, I can be there as a mentor. I think I’ll get a sense of gratification from guiding a young person from injury to performing the way that they want to. I can’t wait to see my patients get healthy.”

Click here to read Logan’s Story from Middlesboro Daily News.

Forbes Names Appalachian Regional Healthcare Among Top Ten Employers in Kentucky

June 19, 2019 – According to Forbes Magazine and global market research company Statista, Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) is the ninth best employer in Kentucky, based on employee satisfaction surveys. To arrive at these rankings, Statista experts surveyed thousands of employees on criteria like salary, atmosphere, and working conditions.

ARH, ranked ninth, is also one of only two companies in the report’s top ten Kentucky employers to be headquartered in Kentucky (the other being University of Kentucky). ARH is the single largest employer in southeastern Kentucky and the third largest private employer in southern West Virginia, but as one of the Top 10 best employers in Kentucky, ARH is in company with major international corporations such as Ford Motor Company, Toyota NorthAmerica, and FedEx.

Appalachian Regional Healthcare was founded in 1956 and now serves 350,000 residents across Eastern Kentucky and Southern West Virginia, operating 12 hospitals in addition to multispecialty physician practices, home health agencies, HomeCare Stores, and retail pharmacies, The ARH system employs more than 5,000 people and has a network of more than 600 active and courtesy medical staff members representing various specialties.

ARH also supports students in the medical field through intern and externships and the ARH Scholars Program, which awards thousands of dollars in academic scholarships annually. Those who are interested in working for Appalachian Regional Healthcare can visit ARHCareers.org.

For more information, please contact Linda Schuster by phone at (502) 592-5400 or by email at Linda@QtheAgency.com.

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ARH Scholars Fall 2018 Winner: Brooke Benton

The Fall 2018 class of Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) Scholars includes students from all over the region, in various stages of life with one common goal – to make a difference in healthcare throughout Appalachia. Twice a year, students from across the region are invited to apply for the ARH Scholars program. Recipients are awarded a $5,000 academic scholarship to pursue a degree in healthcare.

Brooke Benton grew up in a small town called Jackson in Eastern Kentucky. She completed her undergraduate studies at Transylvania University where she studied Chemistry and Classics. She is currently a 4th year medical student at the University of Pikeville Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine. Before entering medical school, Brooke served as a college and career counselor at Jackson City School and a high school chemistry and physics teacher at Breathitt County High School in Jackson. While she loved Lexington, she decided to return home for medical school to be closer to family, friends and the community she loves. She originally decided to pursue medicine after attending a health careers summer camp at the University of Kentucky.

“When I was a sophomore in high school, I was invited to the University of Kentucky for a summer camp with health careers,” Brooke says. “I did a lot of shadowing and classes over the summer, and that’s really what initially drew me to medicine.”

Entering medical school, Brooke had the option to complete coursework to become a Doctor of Medicine (MD) or a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO). She ultimately chose the Osteopathic path which focuses on treating the entire body and mind rather than just the physical body.

“Osteopathic medicine just means that it’s a different philosophy,” she says. “It’s a very old tradition and I think it’s a growing one. It’s grown a lot in the last couple of years with new schools popping up all over the country.. After we graduate, we get the DO professional title after our name. We have the same practice and privilege rights as MDs. I took all the same classes and licensing board exams, and the curriculum is the same; the added benefit is the philosophy as well as training in osteopathic manipulative treatment (“OMT”). We have specific details within that philosophy about how we’re treating the whole patient’s body. We utilize OMT as a modality of treatment just as we might prescribe a medication or do a surgical procedure; this is a noninvasive and conservative approach to relieving dysfunction within the musculoskeletal system to better enable the body to heal itself from various ailments, be it back pain, headaches, acid reflux, etc. ”

This concept of treating the entire body and using a more holistic approach to healthcare intrigued Brooke. She has always had a passion for science, but as she began working more with patients, she developed a passion for the personal aspects of healthcare.

“Honestly, I didn’t know a whole lot about osteopathic medicine before I enrolled in medical school in Pikeville – I just wanted to go to medical school and really wanted to be close to my family,” Brooke says. “The more I delved into the history and philosophy behind it, I realized it’s something that is really easy to get on board with. We all want to be treated as a person. We don’t want to be treated as a lab value or an x-ray. I liked talking to people and learning about their stories, and that’s been a fun component of this as well. Learning more about people – where they come from, what motivates them – that goes over well with patients because we all want to be heard. That fits well with my goals and my career.”

Brooke has had several mentors throughout her life including her mother and two women who have served as examples in the medical field.

“My mom has been a big supporter and having her presence has been a big help,” she says, “Med school is busy. I don’t have a lot of time to do the normal running errands and keeping house work. She always listens if I’ve had a bad day or helps if I need something, so it’s great having that support system. Dr. Joanna Santiesteban, MD , an OB/GYN in Auxier, KY at Physicians for Women, has been a great mentor who guided me when I first was interested in the field of OB/GYN and trained me during my third year of med school for clerkship. What I know about the basics of OB/GYN, I learned from Dr. S. Dr. Holly Gallion, MD introduced me to a subspecialty within OB/GYN, gynecologic oncology. She taught me not just how to be a surgeon but how to treat people. I got ‘How to be a Surgeon 101’ from her, and I also learned how to take care of patients and make them feel like they’re more than just a medical record. At the end of the day that’s what we’re all about.”

Since entering medical school, Brooke has had the chance to complete clinical rotations all over the country. This has allowed her to gain experience in various hospital atmospheres preparing her for anything she faces as a physician. She was completing her rounds during a shift at the University of Kentucky when she learned she had been named an ARH Scholar.

“I was just at the hospital taking care of my patients [when I got the news], so it was a nice surprise,” she says. “It was a difficult week, so it was nice to have good news. I was very excited and honestly a little bit surprised, but good surprised. This scholarship means I will have freedom to advance my career without the stress of extra loan money.”

“The scholars are selected by the ARH Scholars Judging Committee,” says Danya Anderson, ARH Scholars Coordinator. “Once I receive the applications, I prepare them to be sent to the committee by making them a ‘blind’ application, which makes it fair for each applicant. The Scholars award is paid in two installments of $2,500 directly to the school.  One is payable after verification and the other is paid the following year. For this round, we had 73 applicants with 10 finalists awarded.”

After completing her residency, Brooke plans to return to Eastern Kentucky to practice as an OB/GYN. She is excited to offer care to women and their families, some of whom only ever visit the OB/GYN for care. Her heart is in the Appalachian region with the community she loves. She believes if the people in her hometown need her, it does not make sense to go elsewhere to practice.

“I just really want to take care of women and their families,” she says. “It’s about bringing awareness to women’s health issues. For a long time, there was a stigma associated with having a ‘female problem’ and it’s something we don’t really talk openly about. If someone has high blood pressure or diabetes, we’ll talk about that. But when women are coming to their providers, there’s a certain hesitancy, even with their providers who they trust, to discuss these issues. I really hope I can help to break down these barriers. If I can hit a targeted population that may not be getting preventative care elsewhere, I want to fill that gap.”

ARH Scholars Fall 2018 Winner: Lauren McCurry

The Fall 2018 class of Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) Scholars includes students from all over the region, in various stages of life with one common goal – to make a difference in healthcare throughout Appalachia. Twice a year, students from across the region are invited to apply for the ARH Scholars program. Recipients are awarded a $5,000 academic scholarship to pursue a degree in healthcare.

Lauren McCurry is setting out to give a voice to those who cannot speak for themselves. Originally from Harlan County, Lauren graduated from Harlan County High School as valedictorian. She is now an honors student at Western Kentucky University (WKU) studying Communication Sciences and Disorders. School and community involvement are very important to her as she is the finance assistant of Alpha Delta Pi Sorority, and a member of the National Student Speech Language Hearing Association (NSSLHA), the American Sign Language Organization (ASLD), Omicron Delta Kappa National Leadership Honor Society, Christian Student Fellowship, and Circle of Sisterhood Foundation.

There have been several influences in Lauren’s life that sparked her interest in the medical field. Both of her parents are healthcare professionals whom she says instilled strong work ethic and dedication to everything she does. In addition, her brother was born with profound to severe lateral hearing loss. She says he has had a major impact on her life and inspired her to enter this field of study.

“All my life I’ve witnessed how [my parents’] careers have allowed them to fulfill their passions for serving others,” Lauren says. “I truly believe that both my parents have a servant heart and this is something I share with them, so I just knew a career in healthcare was for me.”

Lauren gushes about her mother, Terry McCurry, emphasizing what an incredible person and healthcare professional she is and how she has impacted her life in ways she cannot even express.

“My mom is such a hard worker, she loves and cares for everyone she meets,” Lauren says. “She’s a wonderful mom, an incredible wife, a gifted nurse, my best friend and everything that I aspire to be one day. Her impact on my life can best be summarized through the song I Hope You Dance by Lee Ann Womack. When I was a child my mom chose this song to emphasize an important message and my daily reminder to experience the life that I’ve been blessed with. There are so many opportunities out there by which we can learn and grow and help others, so when we get the choice to sit it out or dance, the hope is that we would dance, step out of our comfort zone and take chances that we would not normally take; that we would persevere through the hard times and never give up on our dreams.”

In addition to her family connections to the healthcare field, Lauren has had the opportunity to work closely with Gail Murray, a Speech Language Pathologist (SLP) for ARH.

“I have had so many opportunities to shadow her,” Lauren says. “She’s been a constant source of encouragement, especially when I applied to the program, and even now that I’m in the program.”

Lauren originally heard about the ARH Scholars program through her mother. As an ARH employee, Terry receives an email newsletter where she saw an ad about the program. Lauren was ecstatic and a bit shocked when she found out she was a winner.

“Funny story, I was actually scrolling through Facebook one morning and I saw a story that ARH posted and I was listed as one of the ARH Scholars,” she says. “I eventually received an email and then letter in the mail. I just remember being so overwhelmed with emotion. ARH has provided so many wonderful opportunities for me and my family over the years, so being selected as a ARH scholar is just icing on the cake for the stage of life I’m in right now. It’s truly an honor and a blessing that will help me to fulfill my dreams of pursuing a career in healthcare.”

After graduation Lauren says she plans to return to her hometown, Harlan, Kentucky, to provide healthcare services to the Appalachian community.

“The sky’s the limit,” she says. “I don’t know what God has planned for me right now. Ultimately my goal is to help improve the quality of life for those in need of healthcare services, specifically those needing speech therapy services.”

Lauren is beyond thankful for the opportunity to become an ARH Scholar and hopes to one day make the same type of impact ARH is making in Eastern Kentucky and Southern West Virginia.

“ARH scholars is such an incredible opportunity to help students that are in the pursuit of education within healthcare,” Lauren says. “It’s also a great opportunity for ARH to encourage the return of professionals to provide quality healthcare within the ARH community. I’m just so thankful for ARH’s dedication and support for college students like myself.”

ARH Scholars Fall 2018 Winner: Sarah Hoskins

The Fall 2018 class of Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) Scholars includes students from all over the region, in various stages of life with one common goal – to make a difference in healthcare throughout Appalachia. Twice a year, students from across the region are invited to apply for the ARH Scholars program. Recipients are awarded a $5,000 academic scholarship to pursue a degree in healthcare.

Sarah Hoskins grew up in a family full of medical professionals. From a young age her family instilled the importance of working in the healthcare field and the impact they make every day. Her mother, great aunt and cousin all work for ARH. It’s only fitting that Sarah carry on her family’s ARH connection as an ARH Scholar.

“I have a lot of family members who work at ARH, so growing up seeing them helping so many people and enjoying their jobs really inspired me to do the same,” she says.

She graduated from Belle County High School and is now a sophomore nursing major at Lincoln Memorial University (LMU) where she is also on the cheerleading team. She is from Middlesboro, Kentucky, where she lives with her father who is a teacher at Yellow Creek School Center, her mother who works for Middlesboro ARH, her brother, and their poodle named Pepper. Spending her entire life in the Eastern Kentucky area has fostered a passion for the community she calls home.

Sarah originally learned about the ARH Scholars program from her mother. She saw a flyer for the program posted at Middlesboro ARH during one of her shifts and encouraged Sarah to apply.

“I felt really relieved and extremely excited when I found out I was an ARH Scholar. I think this program is a wonderful thing that allows students to stress less about the financial aspect of school and focus more on their future careers so they can be the best they can be on their career path.”

“The scholars are selected by the ARH Scholars Judging Committee,” says Danya Anderson, ARH Scholars Coordinator. “Once I receive the applications, I prepare them to be sent to the committee by making them a ‘blind’ application, which makes it fair for each applicant. The Scholars award is paid in two installments of $2,500 directly to the school.  One is payable after verification and the other is paid the following year. For this round, we had 73 applicants with 10 finalists awarded.”

Aside from her family’s extensive medical field background, Sarah’s passion for nursing was sparked after a deeply personal experience with an incredible team of nurses.

“I chose nursing for many reasons, but the main reason is because I saw how nurses at Middlesboro ARH helped my late grandmother through her battle with cancer,” she says. “They were really comforting and treated her with the utmost respect. It really showed me how much of an impact they can have on someone’s life. I want to be that for someone.”

Sarah is excited for the opportunity to make a lasting impact in Eastern Kentucky. After her graduation in 2021 she hopes to obtain a position as a registered nurse, possibly with ARH. She says she is open to furthering her education to become a Nurse Anesthetist and is excited to see where her career takes her.

ARH Scholars Fall 2018 Winner: Nancy Dye

The Fall 2018 class of Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) Scholars includes students from all over the region, in various stages of life with one common goal – to make a difference in healthcare throughout Appalachia. Twice a year, students from across the region are invited to apply for the ARH Scholars program. Recipients are awarded a $5,000 academic scholarship to pursue a degree in healthcare.

Nancy Dye has always been an incredibly driven individual. At the age of 16 she was able to begin college early as a student at Big Sandy Community and Technical College where she studied nursing. In fall 2017 she began working for McDonald’s where she says she grew a lot as a person and became more independent. By the age of 18 she graduated from BSCTC, something she says she could not have done without the support of her family.

“My family has shaped me into who I am today and I don’t believe I would have made it this far without them,” Nancy says. “They pushed me to make straight A’s when I felt like giving up and taught me that you never succeed unless you try.”

She is excited to begin classes at University of Pikeville this fall pursuing a RN-BSN degree. Her anticipated graduation year is 2023, but she is debating returning to obtain her Master’s Degree.

“I chose nursing because all I’ve worked towards in life is helping other people,” she says. “I want to do something that is challenging, interesting, and rewarding with my future and make a difference in people’s lives on an everyday basis. I feel that the nursing profession would allow me to do exactly that. I want to help people through difficult times and give them the assistance needed when no one else can.”

Nancy says her mother has served as her biggest mentor throughout life and her career. She has served as a constant source of encouragement through every stage of Nancy’s life.

“She’s always told me, ‘You can do anything you dream of as long as you set your mind to it.’ And that couldn’t be more true,” Nancy says. “I’ve lived by this every day, and I’m truly happy with the decisions I’ve made in my life. Thanks to my mom, I’ve been shaped into a successful woman who only dreams of helping others.”

Nancy learned about the ARH Scholars program through Facebook. She is very thankful for ARH’s efforts to spread the word about this scholarship program to inform the largest number of potential applicants possible.

“Since I’ve already graduated [and I’m about to go back to school] I don’t have connections to hear about scholarships anymore,” she says. “I was ecstatic when I found a scholarship related to the medical field that I could actually apply for. It has taken a huge weight off of my shoulders. One of my biggest fears is student loans and ARH Scholars has helped rid me of that. I couldn’t be happier to have received this award.”

“The scholars are selected by the ARH Scholars Judging Committee,” says Danya Anderson, ARH Scholars Coordinator. “Once I receive the applications, I prepare them to be sent to the committee by making them a ‘blind’ application, which makes it fair for each applicant. The Scholars award is paid in two installments of $2,500 directly to the school.  One is payable after verification and the other is paid the following year. For this round, we had 73 applicants with 10 finalists awarded.”

Nancy is excited to begin this journey toward completing her nursing education and making a difference for the people in her community.

“I’m so excited to get out there and help those who need it,” Nancy says. “To me, that’s what life’s all about. Just seeing people in need hurts my soul. I want to be able to give back and step out of my comfort zone. It would be a privilege to help people when they’re most vulnerable and have no one else. I can’t wait to be part of a team whose number one priority is treating patients with the best care.”

Nancy clearly has a passion for nursing. Through her education and training she hopes to become the best nurse she can be, offering care to those who truly need it.

“I want my patients to know how much I care about them and how passionate I am about my work,” she says. “I can’t wait to see the smile on those patients faces that I help. The satisfaction that it will bring me is unbelievable. I could save a life and that itself is an amazing accomplishment and something that I’ll look forward to everyday.”