KayleeFannin_ARHScholars

Kaylee Fannin Named ARH Scholar

2018 ARH Scholar Kaylee Fannin has a long history with Appalachian Regional Healthcare—she was born at Tug Valley ARH Regional Medical Center in South Williamson.

“I love ARH hospitals,” Kaylee says. “I was born there, and several times when I was growing up I’d fall and twist my ankle and I’d go there to get an x-ray because I thought my ankle was broken. They were always nice and I was never scared to go…It has just always been a part of my life.”

She grew up in Phelps, Kentucky, and recently graduated from Phelps High School this June. As a student she had the opportunity to attend an early college academy through Pike County Schools where she first learned about ARH Scholars. Little did she know, she would learn of her acceptance into the program on one of the most exciting nights of her high school career.

“I was actually at my senior prom when I got an email saying congratulations!” Kaylee says. “I looked at my boyfriend and I was like, ‘Am I reading this right? Am I really a finalist for this? Did I really win it?’ I was so excited and shocked, I messaged my mom immediately and was like, ‘Momma I really won this scholarship!’ Because when we applied I didn’t really know if I had a chance at it.”

As an ARH Scholar, Kaylee will receive a financial reward of $5,000 toward tuition and living expenses while beginning her college career pursuing a degree in Biology at the University of Pikeville. Her goal is to ultimately become an optometrist and help children who have eye sight issues similar to those she dealt with as a child.

“I always grew up saying I wanted to be a doctor, but I didn’t really know what kind,” Kaylee says. “I went back and forth between being a dentist or an eye doctor. Then I talked about optometry for a long time…because my entire life I’ve had eye issues and constantly had to go to the eye doctor and get my eyes checked, so I kind of relate to that. I just want to be able to help people deal with something that I grew up dealing with myself.”

Kaylee received her first pair of glasses in fourth grade and upgraded to contacts in sixth grade.

“I went for a little while before I realized that I had an eye issue, but once my mom found out she took me [to the optometrist],” Kaylee says. “I noticed it myself…because I was having trouble seeing the board and things like that…but just never said anything about it because I was scared to get glasses.”

Kaylee plans to attend the Kentucky College of Optometry at the University of Pikeville and ultimately work in pediatric optometry. She hopes to have the opportunity to work with the school system to offer free eye exams to students in hopes that she can detect any eye issues they may be suffering from.

Kaylee is one of the eleven 2018 ARH Scholars chosen among 72 applicants.

“The competition was very intense,” explained Christopher Johnson, System Director Employee and Labor Relations at ARH. “We are pleased to offer these awards in an effort to encourage individuals to pursue higher education.”

“I feel so blessed to be accepted into [ARH Scholars],” Kaylee says. “I really didn’t know if I had a shot at it so I was super excited to be accepted.”

Story Published in Appalachian News-Express Staff Report

ARH Helps Blake Burke Bring Passion for Sports & Caring for Others Full Circle

 

Blake Burke is a recent graduate of Shelby Valley High School whose love of sports inspired him to pursue a career in Physical Therapy. Blake is one of the 11 students throughout the 12 ARH communities named a 2018 Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) Scholar.

“The scholarships are selected by the ARH Scholars Judging Committee,” says Danya Anderson, ARH Scholars Coordinator. “Once I receive the applications, I prepare them to be sent to the committee by making them a ‘blind’ application, which makes it fair for each applicant. The Scholars award is paid in two installments of $2,500 directly to the school.  One is payable after verification and the other is paid the following year. For this round, we had 72 applicants with 11 finalists awarded.”

As an ARH Scholar, Blake will receive a financial reward of $5,000 toward tuition and living expenses while beginning his college career pursuing a degree in Exercise Science with a minor in Business at Morehead State University. His goal is to ultimately become a physical therapist.

“I’m very grateful,” Blake says. “Any money is good money when it comes to college nowadays…I was pretty excited about it. It’s a great opportunity, especially for people who are going into the medical field. It relates to what I’m doing, it’s great for the community, and it’s a very good helping hand for people who are going into college.”

As an athlete playing basketball, football and baseball throughout his life, Blake can’t imagine not having the ability to walk or run. He has witnessed his grandmother go through physical therapy after having a stroke, an event he says really sparked his interest in the field.

“When I became a freshman in high school I knew I had to pick a career and at first I was interested in engineering, but I kind of realized that wasn’t for me,” Blake says. “My grandmother had a stroke a couple of years ago. She was also diagnosed with cancer right about that time. She went through physical therapy after the stroke and chemo therapy which made her 10 times as weak. I got to see a pretty good group of physical therapists work with her and rehabilitate her and I just wanted to be a part of that because I’ve been on the receiving end. I saw how she had to go through it and I really want to be able to help people with that. There are people who go through that every day.”

After completing his undergraduate degree, Blake plans to attend physical therapy school at the University of Kentucky. Ultimately, he would love to open his own private physical therapy practice.

“I just like to help people,” Blake says. “I understand it’s hard. Physical Therapy is not something that can happen over night. I just want to help people go from completely not being able to walk or do an action to being able to fully do it without help. I just want to be one of those people.”

Story Published in Appalachian News-Express Staff Report

Elizabeth Jones

Elizabeth Jones named an ARH Scholar

Elizabeth Jones is a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) at the Mary Breckinridge ARH hospital and one of the most recent ARH Scholars. After previously applying for the program, Elizabeth was ecstatic to learn she had been named a Spring 2018 ARH Scholar. Among 72 applicants throughout the 12 ARH communities, Elizabeth was one of the 11 scholarship recipients for this round.

“Oh my gosh!” Elizabeth says. “I cried for 30 minutes [when I found out I was an ARH Scholar], I was so happy. It’s been really hard trying to work and go to school and pay for school so it’s one less thing to have to worry and stress about.”

“The competition was very intense,” explains Christopher Johnson, System Director of Employee and Labor Relations at ARH. “We are pleased to offer these awards in an effort to encourage individuals to pursue higher education.”

As an ARH Scholar, Elizabeth will receive a financial reward of $5,000 toward tuition and living expenses while pursuing her nursing degree at Galen College of Nursing. She began the program in July of 2017 and will graduate this December as a Registered Nurse (RN).

Elizabeth grew up in Hazard and has been married to her husband, Charlie Jones, for 22 years. She has three children, one of which is also pursuing a nursing degree. Elizabeth’s passion for nursing was sparked at a young age, and in 2004, she began her career as an LPN working for a long-term nursing facility. In 2005, she joined the ARH family where she has worked ever since.

“I have always loved taking care of people,” Elizabeth says. “Even when I was little, if my mom or someone got sick I wanted to take care of them. It was just always something I wanted to do.”

Elizabeth’s favorite part of being a nurse is the impact she is able to make every day through her job. She is present for patients’ best and worst days and she is proud to offer the best care possible regardless of the situation.

Elizabeth is excited to further develop her skills to become an RN and continue caring for her community. She plans to stay with Mary Breckinridge after receiving her RN license to continue the good work she is doing in her local community.

“I love working at Mary Breckinridge,” Elizabeth says. “Everyone I work with genuinely cares about the patients and what is best for them. It’s not just a job to us. It’s hard to find an entire team of people with the same goal, but we all work together like family. It’s a small hospital and they need help, so I want to stay there and try to do the best I can for the patients in that area. [I want to] save lives. It’s amazing how many lives you touch when you’re in this field. If you can’t save them, at least be there for them when they go.”

Elizabeth is excited to continue her journey with ARH as both an ARH Scholar and Registered Nurse.

Story Published in Hazard Herald Staff Report

Nurse Hatton Reporting for Duty

McKinnlee Hatton – football player, musician and most importantly, future nurse – has been named a 2018 Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) Scholar.

He grew up in Clay County and is a recent graduate of Clay County High School, where he played football as a left tackle on the offensive line. He says he loves spending his free time playing any instrument with strings and volunteers playing music at the local nursing home with his church, Turkey Foot Pentecostal.

McKinnlee’s interest in the medical field came after a traumatic experience when he was four-years-old.

“As a young kid, I hemorrhaged from a tonsillectomy and if it wasn’t for the doctors and nurses I probably wouldn’t be here today,” McKinnlee says. “I just want to help people and what really sparked it all was being a survivor because of the nurses and doctors.”

He was overwhelmed and happy after learning he had been named one of the 11 Spring 2018 ARH Scholars selected as winners. He was one of 72 student applicants entering the medical field from the 12 ARH communities chosen to participate in the program. As an ARH Scholar, McKinnlee will receive a financial reward of $5,000 toward tuition and living expenses while beginning his college career pursuing a degree in Nursing at Kentucky Christian University in the fall. His goal is to become a nurse offering the same kind of outstanding care as he received as a child.

“The competition was very intense,” explained Christopher Johnson, System Director of Employee and Labor Relations at ARH. “We are pleased to offer these awards in an effort to encourage individuals to pursue higher education.”

“The scholarships are selected by the ARH Scholars Judging Committee,” says Danya Anderson, ARH Scholars Coordinator. “Once I receive the applications, I prepare them to be sent to the committee by making them a ‘blind’ application, which makes it fair for each applicant. The scholars award is paid in two installments of $2,500 directly to the school.  One is payable after verification and the other is paid the following year.”

After completing his undergraduate degree, McKinnlee plans to pursue his Master’s Degree in Nursing and ultimately become a nurse practitioner.

“I want to be a role model for people,” McKinnlee says. “I just want to help others and to show how to be courageous and a good Christian person to other people.”

McKinnlee is excited to begin his college career, making him one step closer to fulfilling his dream of becoming a nurse and bettering his community.

Story published in The Manchester Enterprise

Skyler Richmond

Skyler Richmond Makes Strides Toward her Goal of Becoming an Osteopathic Doctor

Skyler Richmond has an innate ability to help people and loves to volunteer her time making others’ lives better. As a student and recent graduate of Summers County High School, Skyler volunteered with her school’s chapter of the National Honor Society and Beta club as well as an organization called the Yummy Bags Ministry, where she packed bags of food for children in need.

In addition to volunteering her time to help her community, Skyler graduated as valedictorian of her senior class. She maintained a 4.0 GPA from her first year of high school through graduation.

Her passion for helping people translates into her interest in the medical field. She plans to attend West Virginia University’s Institute of Technology in the fall to pursue a major in Biology. As an ARH Scholar, Skyler will receive a financial reward of $5,000 toward tuition and living expenses.

“I’ve always been interested in biology and sciences,” Skyler says. “I just really like to help people and that’s one of the most hands-on ways you can help people is through the medical field.”

After completing her undergraduate degree at WVU, Skyler plans to enter the Green Coat Program at the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine in Lewisburg, West Virginia. Her goal is to ultimately become an osteopathic doctor and eventually a fetal surgeon helping women with reproductive health, delivering babies and achieving full-term delivery.

“I would just like to change the whole world of reproductive health and the birthing process because there are so many issues with it already…to make it seamless if that’s in any way possible,” Skyler says.

Skyler is one of 11 Spring 2018 ARH Scholars selected among 72 applicants from the 12 ARH communities throughout West Virginia and Kentucky.

“The scholarships are selected by the ARH Scholars Judging Committee,” says Danya Anderson, ARH Scholars Coordinator. “Once I receive the applications, I prepare them to be sent to the committee by making them a ‘blind’ application, which makes it fair for each applicant. The scholars award is paid in two installments of $2,500 directly to the school.  One payable after verification and the other is paid the following year. For this round, we had 72 applicants with 11 finalists awarded.”

Skyler is ecstatic to be named a 2018 ARH Scholar and is eager to begin her college career in the fall.

Story published in The Hinton News

Join Us for the ARH Career Fair in Pikeville

Ready to Live, Lead and Love What You Do!

Join the Largest Healthcare Provider in Eastern Kentucky and Southern West Virginia for a Career Fair.

Thursday, June 7
7:30am – 8pm
Hilton Garden Inn
849 Hambley Blvd., Pikeville, KY

Whether you have 20 years on the job or you are just out of school, you’ll find great benefits, room to grow, and lots of opportunities for advancement at Appalachian Regional Healthcare!

NOW HIRING…

  • RNs
  • LPNs
  • Nurse Aides
  • Physicians
  • APRNs
  • Hospital Clerks
  • Personal Care Aides
  • Environmental Care Aides
  • IT Professionals
  • Business Professionals
  • AND MUCH MORE!

To learn more, call 1-855-WORK ARH!

 

ARH Scholars 2018

Appalachian Regional Healthcare Releases Names of 2018 ARH Scholars Award Winners

Appalachian Regional Healthcare is standing behind its commitment to provide
financial assistance to standout college students with the ARH Scholars Award.
The ARH Scholars Award is a scholarship program designed to help fund the
cost of education for those interested in seeking a career in healthcare.
The award is open to all those living in any of our ARH communities. ARH will
pay $5,000 directly to the recipient’s school of choice to go toward tuition.
Moreover, ARH will provide mentors who will be directly engaged with each
student to ensure successful completion of their education.

This round’s eight recipients were selected from a very diverse, competitive
group of people who are all extremely passionate about their healthcare career
choice. All share a common ground: wanting to have a lifelong role in building
and maintaining healthy communities.


The 2018 Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) Scholars are:


• Sarah Akers, Wheelwright, KY –Attends University of Pikeville
• Ashley Bergman, Lexington, KY –Attends University of Kentucky
• Jordan Blevins, Baxter, KY –Attends Union College
• Melissa Booth, Pine Ridge, KY –Attends Western Governors University;
employed at ARH
• Carissa Dotson, McAndrews, KY –Attends University of Charleston School of Pharmacy
• Andrew Maxwell, Teaberry, KY –Attends Hazard Community & Technical College; employed at ARH
• Jennifer Turner, Buckhorn, KY –Attends Hazard Community & Technical College; employed at ARH
• Kelsey Whitt, Beckley, WV –Attends Marshall University; employed at ARH

Doris Shuck - West Liberty Tornado 2002

ARH Stories: Doris Shuck pt. 2

Doris Shuck, Pharmacy Technician, Morgan County ARH, recalls the powerful and moving display of support from her ARH family after a 2002 tornado destroyed her home and devastated her community in West Liberty. #OneFamily

Sue Bowling

ARH Stories: Sue Bowling

Sue Bowling, Director of Laboratory Services, Hazard ARH, describes what it means to be “family” at ARH. #OneFamily

Joshua Shepherd

Winning ARH Scholars Award Just a First Step

Breathitt Co. native Shepherd hails from Lost Creek

Joshua Shepherd of Lost Creek has been named a 2017 Appalachian Regional Healthcare (ARH) Scholar and will be receiving a financial award of $2,500 each year for the next two years to be used for tuition and living expenses while attending college. To be selected as an ARH Scholar, the applicant must either be an employee of ARH or be sponsored by a relative who is an employee. Shepherd was sponsored by his sister, Tammie Shepherd-Smith, who works for Hazard ARH Regional Medical Center.

Shepherd currently works for the Veterans Health Administration (VA) in Hazard as a licensed practical nurse (LPN) and says he is proud of helping those individuals who have served in the military. “This one guy I was treating had been a mechanic on Air Force One. He knew personally that Marilyn Monroe had been a passenger aboard that plane and he was very interesting,” said Shepherd, who will be studying to obtain his registered nursing (RN) degree in the fall at Galen School of Nursing, Hazard. “I believe the veterans deserve the best possible care so I take my role very seriously.”

“My ultimate goal is to become a nurse anesthetist,” he said explaining that obtaining his RN licensure is just the next step. “I want to be the best at what I am doing, so that will mean more study. I’m up for it. I want to help my patients get back to being the best they can possibly be physically.”

Shepherd said he was grateful for his sister’s recommendation since he is not currently an ARH employee. “I’ll end up working for ARH,” said Shepherd, “but it was good she got me in. This award means the world for me because it takes a lot of the financial burden off of me and my family.”

Shepherd is also looking ahead to maybe his wife winning an ARH Scholars award one day soon. “My wife is an LPN so she needs to step up next,” he said while adding, “and we have three children! We’d love it if we were all part of the ARH family.”

Credit: Special to the Jackson-Breahitt County Times-Voice